Round Rhyd-y-croesau

When we first walked the Cistercian Way in 1998, we used an awful lot of the Offa’s Dyke Path. To be honest, you could use the OD virtually all the way from the Clwydian range to Strata Marcella and Welshpool, but it felt uncomfortable for several reasons. Sections are very heavily walked, it goes through some very sensitive ecologies, and it really feels like cheating to use so much of an existing route. Since then, I have redone the northern section so that it goes down the Vale of Clwyd and over Mynydd Llantysilio. In 1998 we left the OD at Llangollen and found an alternative route over the Ceiriog hills. Rewalking that in 2005 I found that much of what I had done in 1998 was now the Ceiriog Trail.

But we were there first!

In 1998 and 2005 we cut down into Rhydycroesau and worked our way across to the Candy Woods to join the OD Path. That was never very satisfactory – it isn’t a good section of the OD and a lot of it seemed to go along the actual monument, which can cause damage. It did look as though it ought to be possible to follow the Ceiriog Tral a bit further then walk along the lanes to join the OD further south.

I had a meeting in Ironbridge with the Church Monuments Society’s web designer. Fleeing the uproar over the Good Priest of Geddington (that’s another story) I went to stay with friends in Baschurch and had a good day’s walking.

Follow the Ceiriog Trail up from Llechrydau and along the ridge. At SJ 22500 32535 keep straight on, down to cross the Cynllaith and up to the road at SJ 22506 31656.This is the view looking back to the ridge.

Here the Ceiriog Trail goes right but you keep straight on along the tarmac lane to Ty’n Celyn. After the cottage at SJ 22420 31238 this becomes a stony track which swings over the ridge

and down to cross another minor road at SJ 22381 30758. Take the tarmac lane straight on (signposted for Bwlch) and down hill. At SJ 22200 30660

take the left fork, another stony track over the next ridge. At SJ 21788 29953 you meet another tarmac road. Straight across the road a stile and waymark leads to a very steep slope – more of a scramble – down a field.

I’m still nursing a damaged cruciate ligament so I took the road round but the footpath down the field looks clear and it’s waymarked through a gate at the bottom, at SJ 21791 29789. Turn right on the road here and follow it across a stream with some pretty cascades.

Up the other side of the valley at SJ 21660 29408 you reach a T junction. A footpath is waymarked ahead but this takes you some way west towards Llansilin. Instead, turn left on the road and walk down hill. At SJ 22171 29204 cross the main Llansilin road and walk down the lane on the other side (marked Unsuitable for Motor Vehicles).

The first few yards are metalled but it soon becomes a muddy track down to the stream. There is a ford for vehicles and a footbridge to the left. Keep going up the lane on the far side. It was wet and muddy underfoot but clear and passable. At SJ 22484 28685, bear right on a roughly metalled lane.

You are now in the setting for Ellis Peters’ ‘Brother Cadfael’ novel Monk’s Hood. The disputed manor of Mallilie is ahead of you and to your left. Ifor ap Morgan’s farm is below to your right. Away to your right is Llansilin, where the commote court was held.

At SJ 22241 28337, turn left on the road and walk up hill. Ignore the restricted byway to the left at SJ 22363 28127. At SJ 22751 27839, turn right on the track to Glascoed Fach (waymarked as a footpath). After the farmhouse, the lane becomes a field path. Cross two stiles and bear right across the next field to the far right corner. Go over a stile and turn right on the road. After a few yards, at SJ 22231 27242, turn left on a very minor road (signposted Wernddu). Follow this past Graig-wen Wood. Immediately at the end of the wood, at SJ 22428 26786, turn right on a tarmac lane to Wernllyfnant Farm.

This was the only tricky bit all day. The lane goes through the farmyard, which always feels uncomfortable. After the farmyard, there are two gates ahead of you. The bridleway is waymarked through the left-hand gate and to the left of the hedge

but in fact you have to go through the next gate to the right and walk above the hedge.

(This is looking back along the line of the track, clearly above the hedge.)

When the field opens out, keep going on the same line with the steep slope above you to the right, bearing slightly to the left and  towards the stream.  The field is very wet and boggy: pick your way through as best you can. The bridleway goes up hill to a gate at SJ 22619 26294 but there is a stile a little lower down at SJ 22664 26306.

Turn left on the road and walk down hill for a few yards, then at SJ 22722 26304 take the track to the right. This is yet another road-used-as -public-path which eventually becomes a metalled lane and joins the road at SJ 23496 25149.

This was as far as I could get before walking back to the car in Rhydycroesau. It was an excellent walk, quite energetic because you are cutting across several stream valleys, but mostly on good clear tracks and very minor roads. The route crosses and recrosses the border, but there are no markers – the only way to tell what side you are on is to look at the county council logos on the waymarks.

From the road at SJ 23496 25149 you could turn right, cross the bridge, turn left at SJ 23414 25066 and follow the  minor road to join the OD Path south of Nantmawr. Alternatively, turn left, then at SJ 23646 25212 a lane goes down to your right to Ty-coch Farm. This should continue as a footpath, across the stream and becoming a minor road to Nantmawr.

After Nantmawr the OD Path climbs Llanymynech Hill then goes into Llanymynech itself and along the canal bank. Llanymynech Hill has an Iron Age fort plus a well-preserved section of the Dyke, and Llanymynech has pubs, a café and a shop, and is a good base. However, it might be possible to cut south from the road at SJ 23496 25149, possibly through Llanyblodwel, to join the canal bank at Carreghofa. I will have to look at that again.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s