Routing and mapping

Work on the Cistercian Way has taken a bit of a back seat recently for various reasons. I had great plans to work on routes in west and north Wales this summer. Alas, lugging a heavy bag of books off the bus (real first-world academic problem, this) I banged my knee and damaged the cruciate ligament. Then I went on a field trip with the wonderful Eddie Procter (@landscapism, http://landscapism.blogspot.co.uk/ ….), half way up the pilgrim route on Mynydd Maen my knee popped again and Eddie had to haul me out of a bramble bush. Doctor says it will heal but no walking on rough ground. ‘But that’s what I do’ I wailed.

Also no kneeling. That’s the other thing I do (old tomb carvings).

Meanwhile, we have been trying to get maps on the site.  We have permission to use VisitWales’s licence so we can embed marked-up Ordnance Survey maps into the site.

If only it were that simple.

Bizarrely, the Ordnance Survey can’t work with URLs ending .wales or .cymru. This is in spite of the huge number of sites that now have those URLs, including our public transport web site, https://www.traveline.cymru/ . We have asked again and again and they simply stall us – they don’t seem to see the problem. Even the Secretary of State’s office has tried.

But there is some progress. I went to north Wales over the weekend to talk to the Historic Houses Association at Gwydir Castle. Enormous fun, though I’m not entirely sure why I was there – the dedicated couple who have been restoring the house and tracking down its lost treasures know much more about it than I do.

I stayed in Trefriw, where they were having a scarecrow festival.

Princess Siwan and Llywelyn Fawr with locals and the Urdd mascot!

Since I was last walking in the area, Trefriw has done some great work waymarking local paths and producing a leaflet of trails. Some of these actually fill in the gaps and problem areas in the route through that area. Of course, I couldn’t walk any of them – but I did walk along the road, see where routes joined and left, and once the knee is better I can join the dots. Downloadable leaflet at http://www.visitllandudno.org.uk/things-to-do/trefriw-trails-p291871  and more detail of some of the trails at http://www.trefriwoutdoors.co.uk/trefriw_trails.html  (but not trail 9, unfortunately).

It looks as though we can comfortably take the route through the lead mines to the church at Llanrhychwyn (OS ref SH 77474 61672).

This has to be in my top 3 of Welsh churches. A little, unspectacular building, looking as though it has grown out of the bones of the hills, it has a lot of its C17-C18 woodwork

and some intensely moving medieval stained glass.

From here you can cut down footpaths and very minor roads to Llanrwst or Trefriw to find somewhere to stay. You can then continue on the low-level route along the banks of the Conwy or climb back up to the high-level route.

To stay on the high-level route, from the church start by following the leaflet route 8 in reverse. (You have to bear in mind that most of the routes are only waymarked one way, so you have to do a bit more of the work yourself.) Walk back down the lane from the church to SH 77398 61772 and take the road to the left. At SH 76998 62092 take the footpath to the right. Follow the footpath round Penrallt farm and down toward some disused mine workings. At SH 76967 62883 the leaflet route 8 goes right but you go left and down to cross the Crafnant at SH 76967 62883. This puts you on leaflet route 7 (in reverse again). Walk up to the road and turn right.

I got this far in about 2007, took the next footpath to the left at SH 76900 63116, and went up through the woods.

This landed me up to my knees in bog and up to my armpits in bracken and scrub. I got through but I couldn’t recommend it. The leaflet suggests you take this footpath but bear round to the right, keeping to the edge of the woods (OS gridpoints SH 76882 63166, SH 76975 63281, SH 77047 63318, SH 77017 63408), above Gelli-newydd farm and along the lane to the road.  Turn left.

From here you can follow the very minor road over the spur and down to Llyn Cowlyd. For an easier but slightly longer walk, take the footpath to the right at SH 77017 63408. You are now on leaflet route 9 and – glory be – walking it the right way round, so the waymarks should be with you.  You should be able to cut up to this point from Trefriw by taking the road up the hill and following the waymarked path at SH 77834 63344.

Rejoin the road at SH 77587 64723. At about SH 76977 65593 it becomes a lane, then a footpath leading to Brwynog Isaf and Uchaf. Turn right on a minor road at SH 74642 64133. You are now on the higher-level route as described on the web site. Take the footpath over the spur and down to the ruined dam of Llyn Eigiau, then on to Conwy Mountain.

I haven’t actually walked any of this, but it looks as though it should work.

And Crafnant House in Trefriw is an excellent place to stay – peace, quiet, good books and amazing vegan breakfasts. Usually the vegan breakfast is what’s left when you remove the bacon, eggs and anything with milk. At Crafnant House I had vegan French toast one day and a sweet potato hash that would have made a perfectly good supper the other day. Highly recommended.

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2 thoughts on “Routing and mapping

  1. I’ll get a proper report on the North Wales Pilgrim Way west – east on my blog this week. It’s no more difficult following it that way than navigating the Cistercian Way. Enjoyed it.

    Andy

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