Angels and visions

Tintern-Llantarnam is pretty much sorted and we are working our way back up the borders. I haven’t walked the area round Llanthony since 2005 and there have been a lot of changes and improvements to the footpaths. The track over the pass from Hay and down the Nant Bwch seems to be the way to go, and it takes you past Llanthony’s third monastery, the strange Anglican community founded by Joseph Leycester Lyne, Father Ignatius. Hugh Allen’s new biography of him is a good read.

Just past the monastery you meet the road from Llanthony over the Gospel pass. Turn left to visit the church at Capel-y-ffin, described by Kilvert as ‘squatting like a stout grey owl’ among the yews of the churchyard. Lovely cherubs on the south wall

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and symbolism on this head stone –

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‘One by one the sheaves are gathered’. Just south of the churchyard, at SO 25483 31495, take the lane alongside the churchyard wall,

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across the Hoddnu

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and past another tiny church.

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This is Capel-y-ffin Baptist chapel built by the two brothers, William and David Prosser. According to Wikipedia, ‘a wall plaque commemorates their work in bringing The Ministry of the Gospel to their house in the year 1737. And Secured this Place for That Sacred Use for the Time Being. Both died near the End of the Year 1780.’

The lane bears up to the right, passing above Blaenau farm and becomes a path across the fields.

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It is well walked and waymarked as a route up to the Offa’s Dyke path.

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Cross two pretty stone stiles (the second at SO 26068 31171  is a bit of a challenge)

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and continue on the same line along a stony track.

Nell and Cara coupldn’t manage the stiles. Cara is getting old and creaky but hates being picked up. Nell is just daft. So we went back along the track, they had a good swim in the Hoddnu and we walked down and up a very steep stony lane to rejoin the track at the far side of that very precipitous stile. Walking along the road and down that lane is the best way to go if you have dogs.

The farm above the track at SO 26521 31032  is called The Vision, and was given that name after the famous vision of the Virgin Mary at Father Ignatius’s monastery. The farm inspired Bruce Chatwin’s novel On the Black Hill, though he relocated it to the other side of the Hatterall ridge.

At SO 26701 30804 the track becomes a metalled road. There are some footpaths to the left but they mostly go up the ridge. The road is very quiet, little more than a farm track, and an easy walk. After about 1.8 km, at SO 27735 29421 , the road turns to the right. Go through the gate ahead of you and continue along a narrow lane. This has all the feel of an old road, possibly the original road down the valley. It would be too narrow for carts, so once the local farmers took to using wheeled vehicles the road across the valley would be easier. I walked along the lane to rejoin the metalled road at SO 27912 28728 but it might be worth exploring the track that bears left at SO 27795 29061 and becomes a footpath passing above Broadley farm and rejoining the road at SO 28502 28103.

At SO 28560 27946 you turn left on the main road down the valley (usually quite quiet, though it can be busy on summer weekends) with encouraging views of the priory and the Half-Moon pub.

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Ahead of you is the priory gatehouse, now a barn. When the road bears right round the gatehouse, take the footpath straight on to the rest of the priory buildings.

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